Alternative stories

After the passing of my Grandmother her Friend told us the story. Their history. Their her-story.


Two friends who loved one another dearly, live close to one another, care for both their families. When I started rummaging through bookcases and old files, I found plenty of similar stories.
Yet when I look through old family photos, these histories aren’t there. In “Alternative Histories” I ask about that which is hidden; about anti-history. I am creating new narratives through memorabilia and documents. I look for old family photographs, and together with models we remake them into images featuring women only. I photograph genuine couples and groups who lead lives together. In a sense, we are replaying history anew. In one sense we are fabricating, but in another we are recalling the memories that have left little permanent mark.

What’s “authentic” here? That’s precisely my challenge: questioning the very notions of the “truth” of images, the reality of documentation, the authenticity of official history, and the essence of photography as a medium.

It is also a voice on an important social topic: the invisibility of certain relationships that exist in society, pushing them aside as irrelevant. To begin with, viewers are convinced that they are looking at authentic old photos; after a while they realize that some elements don’t make sense. Finally it becomes clear that they are looking at a photo that never was. And yet it depicts something that has existence; so what’s going on? Did it exist or not?

Alternative stories

After the passing of my Grandmother her Friend told us the story. Their history. Their her-story.


Two friends who loved one another dearly, live close to one another, care for both their families. When I started rummaging through bookcases and old files, I found plenty of similar stories.
Yet when I look through old family photos, these histories aren’t there. In “Alternative Histories” I ask about that which is hidden; about anti-history. I am creating new narratives through memorabilia and documents. I look for old family photographs, and together with models we remake them into images featuring women only. I photograph genuine couples and groups who lead lives together. In a sense, we are replaying history anew. In one sense we are fabricating, but in another we are recalling the memories that have left little permanent mark.

What’s “authentic” here? That’s precisely my challenge: questioning the very notions of the “truth” of images, the reality of documentation, the authenticity of official history, and the essence of photography as a medium.

It is also a voice on an important social topic: the invisibility of certain relationships that exist in society, pushing them aside as irrelevant. To begin with, viewers are convinced that they are looking at authentic old photos; after a while they realize that some elements don’t make sense. Finally it becomes clear that they are looking at a photo that never was. And yet it depicts something that has existence; so what’s going on? Did it exist or not?